Palo Santo

Bursera graveolens, known in Spanish as palo santo (“holy wood”), is a wild tree native from Mexico and the Yucatán Peninsula to Peru and Venezuela that inhabits the South American Gran Chaco region (northern Argentina, Paraguay, Bolivia and the Brazilian Mato Grosso). It is also found in Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Colombia, Ecuador, Peru and on the Galápagos Islands.  Continue reading “Palo Santo”

Petitgrain

Petitgrain is an essential oil that is extracted from the leaves and green twigs of the bitter orange tree (Citrus aurantium ssp. amara) via steam distillation. It is also known as petitgrain bigarade. Its main regions of production are Paraguay and France, with the former’s product being of higher odour tenacity. Continue reading “Petitgrain”

Peumus boldus

Peumus boldus, the only species in the genus Peumus, is commonly known as boldo (from the Mapudungun name foḻo). This tree of the family Monimiaceae is natively endemic to the central region of Chile, occurring from 33° to 40° southern latitude. Boldo has also been introduced to Europe and North Africa, though it is not often seen outside botanical gardens. Continue reading “Peumus boldus”

Picea (spruce)

A spruce is a tree of the genus Picea a genus of about 35 species of coniferous evergreen trees in the family Pinaceae, found in the northern temperate and boreal (taiga) regions of the Earth. Spruces are large trees, from about 20–60 m  tall when mature, and have whorled branches and conical form. Continue reading “Picea (spruce)”

Salvia rosmarinus (rosemary)

Salvia rosmarinus, commonly known as rosemary, is a woody, perennial herb with fragrant, evergreen, needle-like leaves and white, pink, purple, or blue flowers, native to the Mediterranean region. Until 2017, it was known by the scientific name Rosmarinus officinalis, now a synonym. It is a member of the mint family Lamiaceae, which includes many other herbs. The name “rosemary” derives from Latin ros marinus (“dew of the sea”). Continue reading “Salvia rosmarinus (rosemary)”

Salvia apiana (White sage)

Salvia apiana (white sage, bee sage, or sacred sage) is an evergreen perennial shrub that is native to the southwestern United States and northwestern Mexico, found mainly in the coastal sage scrub habitat of Southern California and Baja California, on the western edges of the Mojave and Sonoran deserts. S. apiana is a shrub that reaches 1.3 to 1.5 metres tall and 1.3 metres wide. The whitish evergreen leaves have oils and resins that release a strong aroma when rubbed. Continue reading “Salvia apiana (White sage)”

Sandarac

Sandarac (or sandarach) is a resin obtained from the small cypress-like tree Tetraclinis articulata. The tree is native to the northwest of Africa with a notable presence in the Southern Morocco part of the Atlas mountains. The resin exudes naturally on the stems of the tree but is also obtained by making cuts on the bark. It solidifies when exposed to the air and comes to commerce in the form of small solid chips, translucent, and having a delicate yellow tinge. Continue reading “Sandarac”

Sandalwood

Sandalwood is a class of woods from trees in the genus Santalum. The woods are heavy, yellow, and fine-grained, and, unlike many other aromatic woods, they retain their fragrance for decades. Sandalwood oil is extracted from the woods for use. Both the wood and the oil produce a distinctive fragrance that has been highly valued for centuries. Continue reading “Sandalwood”

Sweet Grass

Hierochloe odorata or Anthoxanthum nitens (commonly known as sweet grass, manna grass, Mary’s grass or vanilla grass, and as holy grass in the UK, is an aromatic herb native to northern Eurasia and North America. It is a sacred grass of the indigenous peoples of Canada and the United States. It is used as a smudge, in herbal medicine and in the production of distilled beverages. It owes its distinctive sweet scent to the presence of coumarin.
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Tilia (Linden)

Between June and August, the various types of linden blossom in Berlin and put the city in euphoria or at least in a state of diminished displeasure. Winter lime trees (Tilia cordata), large-leaved linden trees (Tilia platyphyllos) and Dutch linden trees (Tilia × europaea) grow in Berlin.

 

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